Oracle Dynamic SQL – generic search

From Michael Rosenblum’s blog a series of three posts on how to do a generic dynamic SQL search in PL/SQL with Native Dynamic SQL – the example does not use DBMS_SQL and uses bind variables to help optimize the query. In

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Posted in BLOG, Oracle, PL/SQL, What's New

What is the role of the database in web architecture?

Many web developers think that the answer to this question is: “As a useless artifact fit for a museum”.  Probably the most common perspective among JavaEE developers is: “As a place to store persistent copies of our classes”.  Organizations having a

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Posted in Consulting, Development

Top 5 Issues that Cannot be Resolved by DBAs at NYOUG

The New York Oracle Users Group held its Spring General Meeting yesterday. It was a great meeting with great speakers, including: Alex Gorbatchev from Pythian gave a presentation about eliminating guesswork from our decision making process in Oracle (BAAG Party) Michael Rosenblum – Dulcian, Inc. discussing common system issues

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Posted in Conferences, Events

And the #1 killer of performance in a web application is…

OK, sure, if you write a query that takes 10 minutes, then your performance is going to be terrible.  But of all the systems I have seen, usually there is somebody around who can both detect a long running query

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Posted in BLOG, Consulting, Development

Case-sensitive object names

A tip/funny story from our colleague Grigoriy Novikov: There was one project with which I was involved that required a lot of different tools used by a lot of developers with different fields of expertise. The Java developer group was

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Posted in Code tips, Consulting, Resources, SQL

The Software Architect’s Manifesto

We should insist on tools that support good architecture and allow us to build quality systems. There is no reason why systems built today should be harder to build than they were years ago.  Just because we moved to the

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Posted in BLOG, Consulting, Development, Resources

Surviving Major Database Architecture Changes – ODTUG Journal 2012

Michael Rosenblum published this article in the ODTUG Journal in 2012. The Introduction is below: Changes are inevitable in any information system. Even with the best possible requirements analysis, it is extremely hard to anticipate all of the potential changes

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Posted in Articles, Conferences

Expert PL/SQL Practices for Oracle Developers and DBAs

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Expert PL/SQL Practices for Oracle Developers and DBA’s was released on August 1, 2011. It was written by 15 PL/SQL senior developers and DBAs. Since one of them is my colleague and friend, Michael Rosenblum (Misha), I got the chance to

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Posted in BLOG, Our Books, Resources

Creating a comma-separated list of items from a column

We needed to create a comma-separated list of items out of a column. We wanted “Red,Orange,Blue,Black,White”, and in the database we had Red Orange Blue Black White Grigoriy Novikov came up with a number of solutions: Solution 1: The basic

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Posted in BLOG, Code tips, Oracle, PL/SQL, SQL
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